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djstone 10-25-2019 07:04 PM

Cold Water Gear
 
Hello! A few weeks back I took a little dip in the Shenango River and learned first hand how cold 60 degree water feels. I've been doing some research into cold water gear and I have a question. If you have a wet suit on and get flipped into the water, do you change out of that wet suit or would you still be warm and able to finish the rest of the trip? Also, is neoprene supposed to fit you like a tight glove? Getting this stuff on is like trying to put 10 pounds of feed into a 5 pound sack!

Thank you for your input.

As always,asking for a friend.

Darla

P.S. Ken, I was just teasing you. I'm sorry I call you a meanie.

JPTolson 10-25-2019 07:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by djstone (Post 5681)
If you have a wet suit on and get flipped into the water, do you change out of that wet suit or would you still be warm and able to finish the rest of the trip? Also, is neoprene supposed to fit you like a tight glove?

The wet suit is intended to warm the water between it and your skin. (Some wear a thin layer of polypro beneath the wet suit.) In theory, you should not need to change out of the wet suit once immersed. However, just how warm one stays will depend on air temperature, wind, and how active the paddler is. It's a good idea to wear a paddling jacket as an outer layer and either a wool or fleece sweater beneath the paddling jacket, depending on the air temperature. You might want to change into a dry sweater if you spill and are carrying an extra one with you. And, yes, the wet suit should fit snugly. A Farmer Jane/John style wet suit allows greater freedom of arm movement. I believe 3 mm neoprene is the standard thickness for paddling wet suits, but check further into that.

Hopefully some others will chime in on this topic.

SOS57 10-25-2019 09:36 PM

I wear a 3mm shorty suit in cold weather. Thin poly underneath helps it go on. I have 2 suits and should be between them. There smaller is too tight across my chest and shoulders. So I don't wear it unless I have help you can close it. The next size is actually to loose as it doesn't trap the Water but let's it drain out. If I get wet in cold weather I slip on a thin rainsuit which stops the wind. YES it is much warmer and we'll worth the trouble. However buy it where you can try it for size.

Ambridger 10-26-2019 01:18 PM

I purchased a dry suit that was on sale a few years ago. I have only used it for the Chilly Chili Run, and thankfully I did not go for a swim. It is not insulated, but is supposed to keep you dry. You definitely need a friend to help you in & out of the suit.

Beyond that December trip, I use a pain of dry pants with a splash jacket. I insulate underneath as indicated by the weather. I'm a believer in packing a good dry bag, as most of our trips are near enough to shore that I could climb ashore and change into dry clothes. I also carry a towel and some instant heat packs in my dry bag as well. Something to consider ... if you and the hubby are paddling, maybe have him carry your dry bag and you carry his; if one of you goes for a swim, your dry bag won't be swimming. Also the stuff in my dry bag is packed in zip lock bags.

With all that said, I have considered purchasing a wet suit, just haven't taken the leap yet. It's just another tool in the tool box.

djstone 11-04-2019 07:17 PM

Thanks for all the info. I appreciate everyone's input. I am still working on this. Hopefully, I will have a comfortable solution by spring!


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